Genetics & Human Agency

A $3.5 million research initiative supported with funding from the John Templeton Foundation and support from the University of Virginia. The program is led by Eric Turkheimer. We are now accepting letters of intent proposing research in areas relevant to the application of modern genomics to complex human behavior related to values and character development.

UPDATE:  LETTERS OF INTENT ARE NO LONGER BEING ACCEPTED.  APPLICATION PACKETS HAVE BEEN SENT TO APPLICANTS INVITED TO SUBMIT FULL PROPOSALS. THE APPLICATION SUBMISSION DEADLINE HAS BEEN EXTENDED TO 6/30/16.

Request For Proposals

MAIN REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

Three year awards of no more than $200,000 annually.

JUNIOR REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

One year, renewable awards of no more than $7,500 annually to young investigators.

JOURNALIST REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

One year, renewable awards of no more than $7,500 annually to journalists, funding research and scholarship in the philosophy of behavior genetics.

Recent Project Activities

  • Genetics & Human Agency A $3.5 million research initiative supported with funding from the John Templeton Foundation and support from the University of Virginia. The program is led by Eric Turkheimer. We are now accepting letters of intent proposing research in areas relevant to the application of modern genomics...

  • Genetics & Human Agency A $3.5 million research initiative supported with funding from the John Templeton Foundation and support from the University of Virginia. The program is led by Eric Turkheimer. We are now accepting letters of intent proposing research in areas relevant to the application of modern genomics...

  • Genetics & Human Agency A $3.5 million research initiative supported with funding from the John Templeton Foundation and support from the University of Virginia. The program is led by Eric Turkheimer. We are now accepting letters of intent proposing research in areas relevant to the application of modern genomics...

Recent Blog Posts

  • Against my better judgment, I’m going to begin this blog by talking about Charles Murray. Is there any academic more widely reviled by mainstream social scientists than Murray? The Bell Curve was published in 1994: the first term of the Bill Clinton presidency was barely...

  • In a recent paper I argue that excusable ignorance undermines agent-responsibility and, therefore, liability for costs. Importantly, if epistemic duties are plausibly affected by e.g. cognitive functioning, judgements regarding excusable ignorance and agent-responsibility may change in relation to cognitive functioning.   Does excusable ignorance absolve...

  • With my colleague Benjamin Huppert I just published a paper arguing that genetic influences on sports performance have important implications for distributive justice. In particular, we argue that because favorable genes are undeserved, radically unequal distribution of goods on their basis cannot be justified with...

  • Our first contribution to this wonderful new blog and website system is a brief overview of a project on which we are working, and which forms part of the $3.5 million "Genetics & Human Agency" research initiative, funded by the John Templeton Foundation, with support from the University of Virginia,...

  • Uh oh, I just noticed that there were a ton of comments on the site that needed to be approved.  My old blogging site didn't work that way, I apologize.  I appreciate the comments very much.

  • I recently obtained a copy of David Wechsler's 1935, "The Range of Human Capacities."  To my delight, Chapter 2, "The Measurement of Human Capacities" is an extended analysis of the concept of capacity as applied to intelligence. In fact I disagree with his conclusion, and...

  • Here is a very non-controversial way to frame the IQ Debate: at any given moment, some people have better cognitive functioning than others.  That much is obvious, isn't it?  Some people can spell better, some people can do more complicated math problems, some people have...